Tuesday, 20 November 2012

This week GM-Fitness is talking Back Muscles!

re again....



Last week we discussed The Shoulder! This week We want to talk about the Back..



Did you know  the back serves to:
  1. Support the body. Therefore, it must be solid.
  2.  
  3. Allow movement. Therefore, it should be flexible.
  4.  
  5. Contribute to maintaining a stable center of gravity at rest and, especially, when in motion.
  6.  
  7. Protect the spinal cord with a bony encasement.
The back must be solid in orden to support the body. It is composed of very sturdy bones and powerful muscles.

The spine must be flexible to allow for movement. This is why it is not composed of one solid bone, but 33 separate vertebrae, which are set one on top of the other and connected by a system of muscles and ligaments.

In order to maintain a stable center of gravity, back muscles should be strong so they may act as a counterweight and able to contract in order to compensate for body movements.

To protect the spinal cord, vertebrae have a special shape, with a foramen or canal to house the cord.

The spine

Thirty three vertebrae form the human spine


Lets Now talk Muscles........

 There are an array of large and small back muscles in your body, but the most worked are the trapezius, latissimus dorsi and rhomboids. Keeping these muscles flexible and in shape is essential to fluid, pain-free movement. Working your Latissimus Dorsi which runs from your arm pit downwards will in time give you a great overall v shape.. Which is a wide upper back small waist..

 There are over 640 muscles in the human body with the back roughly Having 56 muscles...

Do you work your Body the way you should? 

Do you Get the benefits from the way you Train?

Why not contact GM-Fitness Cardiff today to learn what best suits your body type...

We offer one to one training/ Group training/ outdoor fitness/ Bikini Fitness...

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Thanks more from GM-Fitness next week...www.gm-fitness.co.uk
You have:

The superficial extrinsic back muscles of
Trapezius
Rhomboid major and minor
Levator scapulae
Latissimus dorsi

The intermediate extrinsic back muscles of
Serratus posterior superior
Serratus posterior inferior (sometimes grouped together as serratus posterior)

The superficial intrinsic back muscles of
Splenius cervicis
Splenius capitis

The intermediate intrinsic back muscles of
Iliocostalis
Longissimus
Spinalis
These are sometimes collectively referred to as Erector Spinae

The deep intrinsic back muscles get more complicated
Transversospinalis is technically a group of muscles, made of the following:
Semispinalis
Multifidus
Rotatores

However, the semispinalis muscle can be further divided into three parts according to the superior parts of attachments as
Semispinalis capitis
Semispinalis thoracis
Semispinalis cervicis

The deep intrinsic layer of muscles continues with
Interspinales
Intertransversarii
Levatores costarum, none of which are considered part of transversospinalis

But some muscles are in the back but have effects elsewhere and so are considered muscles *OF* the back, even though they are muscles *IN* the back (some of them only partially).

Supraspinatus
Infraspinatus
Teres minor
Subscapularis (these are the rotator cuff muscles that are around the scapula in the back)

Teres minor
Deltoid
Psoas major
Quadratus lumborum

Read more: How many muscles in human back | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/303547#ixzz2CmFvCVXl




You have:

The superficial extrinsic back muscles of
Trapezius
Rhomboid major and minor
Levator scapulae
Latissimus dorsi

The intermediate extrinsic back muscles of
Serratus posterior superior
Serratus posterior inferior (sometimes grouped together as serratus posterior)

The superficial intrinsic back muscles of
Splenius cervicis
Splenius capitis

The intermediate intrinsic back muscles of
Iliocostalis
Longissimus
Spinalis
These are sometimes collectively referred to as Erector Spinae

The deep intrinsic back muscles get more complicated
Transversospinalis is technically a group of muscles, made of the following:
Semispinalis
Multifidus
Rotatores

However, the semispinalis muscle can be further divided into three parts according to the superior parts of attachments as
Semispinalis capitis
Semispinalis thoracis
Semispinalis cervicis

The deep intrinsic layer of muscles continues with
Interspinales
Intertransversarii
Levatores costarum, none of which are considered part of transversospinalis

But some muscles are in the back but have effects elsewhere and so are considered muscles *OF* the back, even though they are muscles *IN* the back (some of them only partially).

Supraspinatus
Infraspinatus
Teres minor
Subscapularis (these are the rotator cuff muscles that are around the scapula in the back)

Teres minor
Deltoid
Psoas major
Quadratus lumborum

So, since it depends on how you count them, and because these are paired (i.e. one on the left and another on the right) you could have up to 56 muscle
Read more: How many muscles in human back | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/303547#ixzz2CmE4xPqR






You have:

The superficial extrinsic back muscles of
Trapezius
Rhomboid major and minor
Levator scapulae
Latissimus dorsi

The intermediate extrinsic back muscles of
Serratus posterior superior
Serratus posterior inferior (sometimes grouped together as serratus posterior)

The superficial intrinsic back muscles of
Splenius cervicis
Splenius capitis

The intermediate intrinsic back muscles of
Iliocostalis
Longissimus
Spinalis
These are sometimes collectively referred to as Erector Spinae

The deep intrinsic back muscles get more complicated
Transversospinalis is technically a group of muscles, made of the following:
Semispinalis
Multifidus
Rotatores

However, the semispinalis muscle can be further divided into three parts according to the superior parts of attachments as
Semispinalis capitis
Semispinalis thoracis
Semispinalis cervicis

The deep intrinsic layer of muscles continues with
Interspinales
Intertransversarii
Levatores costarum, none of which are considered part of transversospinalis

But some muscles are in the back but have effects elsewhere and so are considered muscles *OF* the back, even though they are muscles *IN* the back (some of them only partially).

Supraspinatus
Infraspinatus
Teres minor
Subscapularis (these are the rotator cuff muscles that are around the scapula in the back)

Teres minor
Deltoid
Psoas major
Quadratus lumbor
So, since it depends on how you count them, and because these are paired (i.e. one on the left and another on the right) you could have up to 56 muscles in
Read more: How many muscles in human back | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/303547#ixzz2CmE4xP